Life in the Sun – Texas Homeowners

sunset
Photo by Bradley Hook on Pexels.com

Downstairs master, playroom, island kitchen, backyard space, high ceilings and, of course, OPEN CONCEPT.  How many times do you hear that term on HGTV?  A list of your preferences is imperative when you consider purchasing a home.  But there’s so much more to it.  Selection criteria should take into consideration where, how and when you use the space, just for a start.

In Texas, morning sun is a fabulous perk!  But when was the last time you noticed every home in a neighborhood was built with the patio facing East-Northeast?  Lots have a ‘premium’ for a reason.  Solutions are available but when you find ‘the perfect house’, it’s easy to get carried away and overlook important points.  Do you have sufficient afternoon shade for entertaining?  Do you garden?  Have outdoor pets?  Want a pool?

silhouette of forest with birds flying above body of water during sunset
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

What about new construction?  Is the house on a lake?  (That will require another post!)   How will the house sit on the lot?  Do you enjoy morning coffee or evening wine?  Will the glare through the windows require everyone to don dark glasses at breakfast?  Will guests simmer during dinner?  And, if you’re watching the playoffs, will the glare on the screen make your head pound?

Consider wall space – are there too many doors or windows?  Will the sectional sofa you’ve been considering work when you add a Christmas tree in December?  It’s not important to everyone, but is it important to you?  Will traffic flow smoothly through the kitchen or will the family be trampling each other while getting meals on the table?

Imagine getting groceries from the car to the pantry.  Must they be carted down the hall, across the living room, around the island and through the laundry room?  Again, not important to everyone.  But it’s a deal breaker for others.  The monetary investment required for a home is certainly sufficient to require a few thoughtful notes about your lifestyle. Continue reading Life in the Sun – Texas Homeowners

Rain, Snow, Sleet or Hail!

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Add some personality to your space!  In 1923, it became mandatory that each household have a mailbox or a letter slot.  The most popular style, known as the tunnel box, was designed in 1915 by an engineer, Roy Joroleman, who also happened to be a Postal employee.  While functional, I wouldn’t call the tunnel mail box anything but boring.

Should you decide to create your own mailbox, keep in mind there are guidelines to be followed.

  • Position your mailbox 41″ to 45″ from the road surface to the bottom of the mailbox or point of mail entry.
  • Place your mailbox 6″ to 8″ back from the curb. If you do not have a raised curb, contact your local postmaster for guidance.
  • Put your house or apartment number on the mailbox.
  • If your mailbox is on a different street from your house or apartment, put your full street address on the box.
  • If you are attaching the box to your house, make sure the postal carrier can reach it easily from your sidewalk, steps, or porch. (courtesy of the US Postal Service)

Any questions or concerns should be addressed by your postmaster for a stamp of approval.  In addition to your postmaster, check with your HOA.  Their guidelines may be more stringent than those of the Post Office.